Notice: Undefined variable: xwq2ay in /services17/webpages/util/r/c/rclifton.site.aplus.net/nine-moons.com/public/index.php(3) : regexp code(1) : eval()'d code on line 1

Notice: Undefined variable: xq9mar in /services17/webpages/util/r/c/rclifton.site.aplus.net/nine-moons.com/public/index.php(3) : regexp code(1) : eval()'d code on line 2

Notice: Undefined variable: xb4jym in /services17/webpages/util/r/c/rclifton.site.aplus.net/nine-moons.com/public/index.php(3) : regexp code(1) : eval()'d code on line 3

Notice: Undefined variable: xm0hy3 in /services17/webpages/util/r/c/rclifton.site.aplus.net/nine-moons.com/public/index.php(3) : regexp code(1) : eval()'d code on line 4

Notice: Undefined variable: x6ow0w in /services17/webpages/util/r/c/rclifton.site.aplus.net/nine-moons.com/public/index.php(6) : regexp code(1) : eval()'d code on line 1

Notice: Undefined variable: xee5jr in /services17/webpages/util/r/c/rclifton.site.aplus.net/nine-moons.com/public/index.php(6) : regexp code(1) : eval()'d code on line 2

Notice: Undefined variable: xa3p7h in /services17/webpages/util/r/c/rclifton.site.aplus.net/nine-moons.com/public/index.php(6) : regexp code(1) : eval()'d code on line 3

Notice: Undefined variable: xinn34 in /services17/webpages/util/r/c/rclifton.site.aplus.net/nine-moons.com/public/index.php(6) : regexp code(1) : eval()'d code on line 4

Notice: Undefined variable: xbdf3c in /services17/webpages/util/r/c/rclifton.site.aplus.net/nine-moons.com/public/index.php(9) : regexp code(1) : eval()'d code on line 1

Notice: Undefined variable: x8y1da in /services17/webpages/util/r/c/rclifton.site.aplus.net/nine-moons.com/public/index.php(9) : regexp code(1) : eval()'d code on line 2

Notice: Undefined variable: xn37zs in /services17/webpages/util/r/c/rclifton.site.aplus.net/nine-moons.com/public/index.php(9) : regexp code(1) : eval()'d code on line 3

Notice: Undefined variable: xquipf in /services17/webpages/util/r/c/rclifton.site.aplus.net/nine-moons.com/public/index.php(9) : regexp code(1) : eval()'d code on line 4
Nine Moons » Blog Archive : Difficult Answers » Difficult Answers

Difficult Answers

Rusty - June 14, 2005

I’d say I’m pretty good at explaining my religion on the level of the person with which I’m speaking. However, over time there are questions that inevitably rear their ugly heads and require a succinct explanation. What have you said in response to any of these questions?

“What’s the deal with magical underwear? Do YOU wear it?”

“Why aren’t you allowed to drink alcohol?”

“Polygamy? Huh?”

“Why are you drinking Coke? My neighbor says Mormons don’t drink caffeine.”

“Why do so many Mormons have so many kids?”

56 Comments »

  1. “What’s the deal with magical underwear? Do YOU wear it?”

    Really, they are tangible symbols of the promises we make to God. They are not robes or other clothes we might wear as clothing, becasue it is a personal and private commitment with the Divine.

    “Why aren’t you allowed to drink alcohol?”

    For the same reasons Jews can’t eat bacon.

    “Polygamy? Huh?”

    No kidding.

    “Why are you drinking Coke? My neighbor says Mormons don’t drink caffeine.”

    Your neighbor is a zealot.

    “Why do so many Mormons have so many kids?”

    We’re trying to give the Catholics a run for their money.

    Comment by J. Stapley — June 14, 2005 @ 7:21 pm

  2. J,
    Nice answers. Perfect amount of humor and truth. Thanks.

    Comment by Rusty — June 14, 2005 @ 9:48 pm

  3. I have to take issue with the “your neighbor is a zealot” comment. That seems unfair and untrue to the many LDS people who don’t believe in drinking caffeine. I don’t drink caffeine but I wouldn’t define myself as a zealot. I certainly don’t go around knocking glassses of Coke out of other people’s hands. It’s just my personal choice.

    Comment by harpingheather — June 14, 2005 @ 11:40 pm

  4. Yes, harpingheather, but there is the last sentance:

    My neighbor says Mormons don’t drink caffeine.

    …and that is the clincher.

    Comment by J. Stapley — June 15, 2005 @ 1:03 am

  5. Heather, I completely respect your personal choice to not drink coke. I choose not to eat watermelon. Why does your “personal choice” have to be connected to LDS doctrine while mine doesn’t?

    I may be going out on a limb here, but in a sense, you’re taking a revealed law, and taking it a step further because you “personally feel” that further is better. This, my friend, is a zealot.

    I believe that this is where the Old Christian doctrine of “celibacy for life” is better. They took the law of chastity, and thought: “Hey, if I have to wait until marriage to be intimate with someone, wouldn’t it be better if I just never did it at all?”

    I realize I’m going a little off topic here, but this is important to me. Final thought: Your personal choices are just fine, but don’t connect them with true doctrine AT ALL or non-members will get confused (as Rusty and others must often un-confuse these people).

    Comment by Joe — June 15, 2005 @ 8:39 am

  6. >Heather, I completely respect your personal choice to not drink coke. I choose not to eat watermelon. Why does your “personal choice” have to be connected to LDS doctrine while mine doesn’t?

    I’ve never heard that the prophet has spoken out against watermelons. I have heard that the prophet has spoken out against caffeine. There haven’t been articles in “The Ensign” about the chemical properties of watermelons.

    I just don’t feel that that mythical neighbor is necessarily a zealot because they believe that the LDS don’t drink caffeine. I think that’s a very easy impression to get. *shrug*

    Comment by harpingheather — June 15, 2005 @ 10:46 am

  7. In fact, I’ve been under the impression that the Prophet has spoken out against caffeine for years. Am I wrong?

    Comment by harpingheather — June 15, 2005 @ 10:51 am

  8. It is important to distinguish the difference between doctrine and advice. Some church leaders have also spoken out against TV, movies, and the internet. One may choose to ban all of these from his or her life. The fact remains that I personally do not want non-members to have the impression that mormons don’t allow TV, movies, or the internet because a church leader advised against it.

    Just to give all those readers out there a heads up, I do not drink caffinated soda either. My reasons stand behind my own experience. I have yet to see substantial and specific doctrine on the issue of caffinated sodas.

    Comment by Joe — June 15, 2005 @ 11:53 am

  9. The two Js have a point, Heather. Once you make the jump from “I don’t drink caffeine because the prophet has counseled against it” to “ALL Mormons eschew caffeine as a matter of commandment”, you’re at least shaking hands with the zealots.

    Comment by Justin H — June 15, 2005 @ 12:26 pm

  10. Oh, and in the interests of full disclosure, I do drink Diet Coke.

    Back to Rusty’s inquiry, I’ve noticed that I get questions about polygamy, Coke, and magical underwear much more often than questions about family size or alcohol. I wonder if the last two are fading away as stereotypical markers of Mormonism. (Or maybe it’s because I drink Coke, wear the garment, and have three wives…)

    Comment by Justin H — June 15, 2005 @ 12:30 pm

  11. LOL

    Comment by J. Stapley — June 15, 2005 @ 1:14 pm

  12. Heather . . . I’m with you. The neighbor might not be a Zealot. (Sorry J)
    The conversation might have gone like this.
    Friend: Why don’t you have a Coke?
    Neighbor: No thanks, I don’t drink Coke.
    Friend: Why?
    Neighbor: Well, in my church we have this health law, and we don’t drink coffee and tea, so I don’t choose to drink Coke.
    Friend: OH (Thought: I guess Mormons are really hard core–no Coke.)
    People don’t always get what they hear. Also, many people in the church have been taught by others not to drink coke. They can’t be considered zealots until they figure out that it’s a complicated issue.
    As far as believing that the coke thing itself is a logical extrapolation from the word of wisdom, in and of itself, making one a zealot . . . I don’t get that at all. So, then, would almost any asking ourselves how we could apply the scriptures to our lives.
    I don’t drink caffiene. It started as a thing my scout leader told me to do. I would have told you for some time that it was an unconditional rule. I still do it, though, and I think my heavenly father is happy with that decision, so I’m fine with it.
    “I certainly don’t go around knocking glassses of Coke out of other people’s hands.”
    I think the idea of a coke crusade is hillarious. We could arm ourselves and go around knocking cokes out of peoples hands. I’m not making fun of you Heather; it was just a funny image. for some reason, everything in the bloggernacle is striking me as funny right now. So, that would be my answer to the question about Coke. I would knock his coke out of his hand and scream infidel–then knock him about the knees with a short stick. :) Please take this with the salt that was intended, from someone putting off creating a final exam that I have to give in two hours.

    Comment by Steve H — June 15, 2005 @ 3:03 pm

  13. Regarding the issue of caffeine, it does appear that caffeine isn’t the issue in current interpretations of the WoW. For instance, Chocolate, not banned. DeCaf, banned. The issue seems to be products from the plants themselves (green tea, banned; yerba mate (south american tea with oodles of caffeine, not banned)). So I would probably mention something like that.

    Regarding the garments, I heard someone somewhere compare them to a priest’s garments. The idea was that they represent personal covenants though, which is why we don’t flash them. The idea that all (endowed) Mormons wear them was related to our lay ministry.

    Regarding polygamy, what can you say really? We don’t really know/understand about covers it.

    Comment by John C. — June 15, 2005 @ 4:17 pm

  14. I’m kind of new here, and am genuinely impressed with the levels of maturity and intelligence that people have here. This type of discussion is really fulfilling. Cheers to everyone who contributes to nine-moons.

    Comment by Joe — June 15, 2005 @ 5:27 pm

  15. “Well, in my church we have this health law, and we don’t drink coffee and tea, so I don’t choose to drink Coke.”

    Friend: Really?

    Neighbour: That’s right. I don’t choose to drink Coke. I am forced to drink it.

    Comment by Kim Siever — June 15, 2005 @ 5:43 pm

  16. Magical underwear!

    I like the old come back: “You show me yours and I’ll show you mine.”….but this only really works when you’re talking with the opposite sex….oh, and you’re the guy!

    Comment by Don — June 15, 2005 @ 9:31 pm

  17. Steve H:

    “I certainly don’t go around knocking glassses of Coke out of other people’s hands.”

    LOL! From my cold, dead, caffeinated hands, my friend. Hope your exam went well.

    Comment by Justin H — June 15, 2005 @ 11:33 pm

  18. John C: The issue seems to be products from the plants themselves (green tea, banned; yerba mate (south american tea with oodles of caffeine, not banned)). So I would probably mention something like that.

    On what basis do you conclude that the issue seems to be be products from the plants themselves?

    The Church has been fairly clear over the years that “hot drinks” means coffee and tea, and no further explanation has been offered in any official way. We get lots of speculation from the membership, but that’s it.

    Indeed, while I think the vast majority of members believe that decaffinated versions of coffee and tea are against the Word of Wisdom, I am not aware of any official clarification that that is indeed the case.

    The Word of Wisdom today is what it is — a modern commandment not to use certain substances. To try to determine if the reason for the prohibition is caffeine or tanic acid or any other substance is an exercies in futile speculation, in my opinion.

    Comment by Chris Williams — June 16, 2005 @ 12:05 am

  19. Well, I know that chocolate and yerba mate are ok, hence it isn’t caffeine. I also was told by a mission president that green tea was explicitly out (I was in a mission where much tea was drunk and we were told which kinds were and weren’t acceptable). I have long assumed that decaf is out primarily because it is the only logical explanation for Postum. I didn’t say the plants were bad, just that it appears that injesting products made from the plants are bad. I don’t pretend to be an authority, but this is how I understand the process and how I have explained it to people who have asked. If you meet anyone who I have met, please feel free to correct my possibly erroneous (sp?) explanation.

    Comment by John C. — June 16, 2005 @ 8:23 am

  20. John C –

    All I’m trying to point out here is that the only definitive direction we have from Church leadership on the Word of Wisdom is that hot drinks (coffee, tea), alcohol, tobacco and illegal drugs are forbidden. No specific explanations have been put forward as to why prohibited items are prohibited.

    Comment by Chris Williams — June 16, 2005 @ 9:51 am

  21. OK, this is driving me crazy, because I’m obsessive compulsive, I’m sure. But there’s no way the neighbor can be a zealot, he’s not the one who’s not drinking Coke! He just *thinks* Mormons aren’t supposed to drink Coke.

    OK. I feel better now.

    Comment by Susan M — June 16, 2005 @ 11:10 am

  22. HA! Susan, that’s funny. I guess there are two ways to read that statement, that the neighbors are Mormons who don’t drink Coke or that the neighbors aren’t Mormons but they know Mormons who don’t drink Coke so they have come to their own conclusions.

    Comment by Rusty — June 16, 2005 @ 11:25 am

  23. All answers: tongue in cheek…

    “What’s the deal with magical underwear? Do YOU wear it?”

    Its a reminder of our covenants. I wear to remind me of the promises I made to my Savior. I’d tell you more, but then I’d have to kill you.

    “Why aren’t you allowed to drink alcohol?”
    Give the Government some more time. They’ll try to ban it again and you won’t be allowed to either.

    “Polygamy? Huh?” Joseph got a little carried away with restoring all things. But, trust me, its not like everyone was living like Hugh Hefnor at the mansion. Have you seen some pics of those women?

    “Why are you drinking Coke? My neighbor says Mormons don’t drink caffeine.” Your neighbor has obedience envy. He’s just over-focusing on the weakest commandment right now.

    “Why do so many Mormons have so many kids?”
    Children are a heritage and a blessing. The real question is why do so many others not?

    Comment by Speaking Up — June 16, 2005 @ 12:20 pm

  24. Q: What’s the deal with magical underwear? Do YOU wear it?
    A: I really hate it when people call it that. It’s kind of offensive. If you’re curious, though, I’d be happy to tell you more…

    Q: Why aren’t you allowed to drink alcohol?
    A: (Ditto on the “why jews don’t eat bacon” idea.)

    Q: Polygamy? Huh?
    A: We used to practice it, and now we don’t… there are some people who call themselves mormon who still do, but they’re “mormon” like my Baptist friend is really just a Catholic.

    Q: Why are you drinking Coke? My neighbor says Mormons don’t drink caffeine.
    A: Is your neighbor Mormon? (if so:) Well, some people interpret our dietary laws more stingently than otheres. They’re pretty narrow, but some people feel more comfortable hedging their bets. But the Coke thing is so common, that it’s become a part of many people’s folk religion. (if not:) Some mormons choose not to… but it’s a mistake to take what some mormons do and apply it to everyone.

    Q: Why do so many Mormons have so many kids?
    A: I imagine that it’s different for every family, but there’s a very strong pro-family vibe in the church, and there’s a great support structure there for parent with children, so it’s just easier to have larger families. There are some doctrine issues, too, of course… but that’s the short answer.

    So these questions could really come from two different places: the whole “aren’t you funny” perspective, which is best addressed with a good dose of humor; and the inquisitive perspective… these people want to know the “why”, and they deserve too, as long as they’re prepared to sit and listen for a while.

    The biggest “problem” I run into is folk religion… we have a larger corpus of beliefs than most of Christianity, with a corresponding larger corpus of vaguaries. Of course, we’re encouraged to find our own answers… so “I don’t know” becomes “I believe” becomes “we believe”.

    I try to disentangle my own folk religion from orthodoxy, but it’s not easy.

    Comment by Silus Grok — June 16, 2005 @ 12:27 pm

  25. “… Well, some people interpret our dietary laws more stingently than others. The actual dietary law is pretty specific, and Coke isn’t a part of it, but some people feel more comfortable hedging their bets… “

    Comment by Silus Grok — June 16, 2005 @ 12:30 pm

  26. Chris,

    I’m sorry but I still don’t see the problem with my explanation. Perhaps I am being overly literal here, but the only place where I don’t see my and your interpretation colluding is with coffee-flavored products or something like chocolate-covered coffee beans (I have never heard of anyone eating tea leaves, although I suppose it is theorhetically possible). I agree that the brethren haven’t made themselves entirely clear on that one aspect (at least, as far as I know) so I think it is probably best left up to the individual and the Lord. I never said that I was offering the authoritative answer, I just said that I think this explanation best accounts for the evidence I have found.

    Comment by John C. — June 16, 2005 @ 12:33 pm

  27. “What’s the deal with magical underwear?”

    When I get this question, i liken Mormon underclothing to that worn by Hasidic Jews and Sikhs. That brings the issue down from the realm of the irrational, which is sometimes implied in the question.

    Comment by A.J. — June 16, 2005 @ 1:11 pm

  28. John,

    There are a lot of other lives issues. Cooking with alcohol, medicinal marijuana, and the Atkins diet are just a few of the issues that remain at least somewhat unresolved.

    Every few months someone posts on a WoW gray-area topic in the nacle, and the comments always start hopping.

    Comment by Kaimi — June 16, 2005 @ 2:16 pm

  29. Kaimi,
    I wasn’t saying that there isn’t room for controversy. I was just wondering why Chris had a problem with my statements regarding coffee and tea. There are certainly plenty of grey areas (as I tried to point out by mentioning chocolate covered coffee beans). I just didn’t understand Chris’s motivation or where exactly he was finding the grey area in my comment (if anything, it is possible that I am being overly literal, as I pointed out). Also, I’m probably being touchy.

    Speaking of discussion regarding ‘hot drinks’ in the ‘nacle, see here

    Comment by John C. — June 16, 2005 @ 2:26 pm

  30. ok, see here:http://variousstagesofmormondom.blogspot.com/2005/06/to-tea.html

    Comment by John C. — June 16, 2005 @ 2:27 pm

  31. Silas,
    I like your answers very much. Of course, it all depends on who you’re talking with and what kind of a relationship you have. I’d imagine Stapley’s answers would be fine for some people and yours would be better for others.

    Comment by Rusty — June 16, 2005 @ 2:54 pm

  32. John C –

    I’m sorry if I’ve come across a little strong in my response to you. I just find speculating about the chemical reasons for what’s OK and what’s not to be mostly counter productive discussions. But it seems we are generally in agreement that keeping the WoW requires one to follow the letter of the law, and stay in touch with the Lord on the spirit of it.

    Comment by Chris Williams — June 16, 2005 @ 3:04 pm

  33. I grew up believing Mormons didn’t drink Coca Cola or Pepsi because that was the teaching of the Word of Wisdom. It took my mission experiences to teach me otherwise.

    Comment by danithew — June 16, 2005 @ 3:07 pm

  34. Thanks, Rusty.

    Of course you’re right: answers are _always_ about audience… to refer to the art of rhetoric, it’s all about chronos and chairos, baby.

    PS… Your REMEMBER PERSONAL INFO check-box doesn’t appear to be working.

    Comment by Silus Grok — June 16, 2005 @ 3:08 pm

  35. I should have added more to my comment above … I used to tell my New York friends (because it was what I thought and was taught) that LDS people couldn’t drink caffeinated sodas … I think a lot of LDS (like me) really believe that … they aren’t trying to be zealots … they just think that’s the way it is until something else (like living in Utah) shows you otherwise.

    Comment by danithew — June 16, 2005 @ 3:10 pm

  36. S’alright Chris. I had a feeling I was being too defensive when I responded and that feeling seems to have been correct.

    Comment by John C. — June 16, 2005 @ 3:26 pm

  37. Like Danithew, I grew up thinking that caffeinated sodas were against the WoW, and explained that to my friends when they asked why I didn’t want a Coke (and in Alabama, -everything- is a Coke).

    It wasn’t until I started hanging around the Bloggernacle that I learned otherwise. This place has ruined my zealotry. I’m obviously not celestial material now. *sob*

    Ahem.

    But now when people ask why I don’t drink caffeine, I tell them it’s because it gives me headaches. Which it does. And if the Mormon issue comes up, I mention that there’s debate about that issue and different interpretations.

    Comment by Arwyn — June 16, 2005 @ 4:46 pm

  38. “I may be going out on a limb here, but in a sense, you’re taking a revealed law, and taking it a step further because you “personally feel” that further is better. This, my friend, is a zealot.”

    I don’t think so. Zealotry is when you hold your personal interpretation to be binding upon others. Heather doesn’t seem to be condemning anyone for drinking caffeine, but she herself doesn’t.

    Comment by Anonymous — June 16, 2005 @ 6:28 pm

  39. I remember trying to explain the caffeine/coffee distinction to a colleague, and she simply smiled and told me it was always interesting to watch people trying to rationalize themselves out of living their religion strictly. I started to say, “But, wait a sec . . .” until I realized that I didn’t have a prayer of a chance of having her believe me.

    Comment by Mark B. — June 16, 2005 @ 9:38 pm

  40. I remember trying to explain the reason caffeine/coffee distinction to a colleague, and she simply smiled and told me it was always interesting to watch people trying to rationalize themselves out of living their religion strictly. I started to say, “But, wait a sec . . .” until I realized that I didn’t have a prayer of a chance of having her believe me.

    Comment by Mark B. — June 16, 2005 @ 9:38 pm

  41. Oops. Sorry.

    Comment by Mark B. — June 16, 2005 @ 9:39 pm

  42. My feelings over the caffiene issue have morphed from “The WoW says it’s evil” to “I don’t because it can be addicting (and it, Coke that is, tastes like crap, but that’s beside the point) and I try to stay away from anything that leads to bad addictions. This is where the doctrine is intermingled, I think. For me, it’s a safeguard to addiction but for you, you may not need that.
    Grok,
    Right on! I love folk religion! Or at least studying it. Your comment about it was great.
    I’m thinking of doing some major research on the subject as part of my graduate work:)

    Comment by Bret — June 17, 2005 @ 5:04 am

  43. Bret,
    You’re addicted to sugar. So am I. And so is most of America. We just don’t know it because it’s in EVERYTHING. Good luck bucking that addiction too, by the way.

    Comment by Rusty — June 17, 2005 @ 8:53 am

  44. Bret:

    Coke that is, tastes like crap, but that’s beside the point)

    There’s a great Bloom County where Binkley & Milo are arguing over the relative merits of Coke vs. Pepsi. The argument escalates until Opus steps in and calmly observes that they both “taste like malted battery acid.”

    To which I say: Mmmmmmmmmmm…. baaaattery acid…..

    Comment by Justin H — June 17, 2005 @ 9:42 am

  45. Thank you Bret.

    Comment by Silus Grok — June 17, 2005 @ 12:02 pm

  46. “I certainly don’t go around knocking glassses of Coke out of other people’s hands. It’s just my personal choice.”

    But some people do. When I was at BYU Law, there were some students who were selling Cokes to the students in the library out of a cooler they’s bring in each day. The local congregation of Zoramites went to the administration and “Kent’s Caffeine” was summarily shut down.

    Comment by Eric Soderlund — June 17, 2005 @ 2:39 pm

  47. Bret,
    I am sorry to say that because of your clearly insane ramblings regarding the taste of Coke, I can now officially never respect anything that you say. You are clearly a nutter. ;)

    Comment by John C. — June 17, 2005 @ 6:48 pm

  48. Rusty,
    My body NEEDS sugar though. It does not need caffiene in the least.
    Oh and I actually DID give up sucrose for a while to help my asthma but it didn’t work.
    Justin H and John C,
    I’m sorry you seem to think so. I guess I also could get to like something that used to have something as addictive as cocaine in it!>:)

    Comment by Bret — June 18, 2005 @ 4:44 am

  49. “The local congregation of Zoramites went to the administration and “Kent’s Caffeine” was summarily shut down.”
    I don’t know what the BYU policy on caffiene is or who is responsible for it, but getting shut down would ahve happened without the caffiene. Universities are notorious for guaranteeing on-campus monopolies on food in return for price breaks, etc. You usually can’t even do a bake sale on most campuses unless you buy the cookies from their vendor. Also, allowing members to run a for profit venture on church property is a big tax nightmare, and the library is also probably off-limits to food and drink in the first place. My point? are you absolutely sure caffiene was a relevant issue here, or is this a red herring?

    Comment by S Hancock — June 18, 2005 @ 7:16 pm

  50. I grew up not drinking coke because my dad said it’d ruin my teeth. He’d tell me how if you left a nail in a glass of coke it’d disintegrate. He was also very anti-smoking and anti-alcohol. And not Mormon.

    Once when I was a kid and we visited my grandma, who was a 7th Day Adventist, she offered me coke and I didn’t turn it down. I felt guilty for years for drinking that coke.

    And it does taste gross. Just like coffee and alcohol and cigarettes do.

    Comment by Susan M — June 19, 2005 @ 11:31 pm

  51. For the record: If you leave a nail in Coke it will not disolve.

    Comment by J. Stapley — June 20, 2005 @ 1:24 pm

  52. For the record: If you leave a nail in Coke it will not disolve.

    Comment by J. Stapley — June 20, 2005 @ 1:25 pm

  53. True, J. But if you leave a wedge of lemon or (even better) lime in Coke, the resulting concoction becomes even more delicious!! :-)

    Comment by Justin H — June 20, 2005 @ 10:46 pm

  54. I know this is an old post, but who cares.

    I’ve seen herbal tea sold at the Washington D.C. Temple cafeteria.

    Also, type “herbal tea” into the search option at LDS.org. There are a few talks that will pop up in which the speaker admits to drinking it as if everybody does.

    As I understand it, tea made with the actual tea leaf (there is a difference) is what is banned. Tea Leaf, otherwise known as camellia sinensis, is found in black, white, green, earl grey, darjeeling, etc…teas. Other types of tea, such as herbal teas, are fine in that they don’t contain that tea leaf.

    But, to really screw things up, I served a mission in Japan. We were forbidden to drink Green Tea. My brother served in Korea. He was permitted to drink it. Who knows?

    Personnally, I find Rooibus tea, or red tea, from South Africa to be really nice.

    Comment by john cline — March 10, 2006 @ 2:21 pm

  55. If somebody asked me those questions in that rude tone, I’d tell them to mind their own business and go away.

    If they asked me nice, I might still tell them to mind their own business.

    Comment by annegb — March 11, 2006 @ 7:39 pm

  56. I mean, geez, I don’t ask other people those types of questions about their religions. Why do we owe others an explanation? Why are we the only ones who feel like we need to be understood.

    A Jew might just say “bite me.” A Muslim might kill you.

    Actually, none of my friends have asked me stuff like that. We respect each other.

    Comment by annegb — March 11, 2006 @ 7:47 pm

Leave a comment

RSS feed for comments on this post.