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Nine Moons » Blog Archive : So What’s Your Favorite Christmas Tradition? » So What’s Your Favorite Christmas Tradition?

So What’s Your Favorite Christmas Tradition?

Don - December 14, 2007

There are so many Christmas traditions it’s hard to pick. Some from other countries are obviously different than the ones we might be familiar with. Have you adopted any?

My favorite would have to be…..

either watching “A Christmas Carol” and “The Christmas Story” or watching the kids open their presents. (After we make them stay in their rooms until 8am….so we can get some rest after all the preparations on Christmas eve.)

17 Comments »

  1. My favorite Christmas tradition started spontaneously in my family about 10 years ago. Every year on Christmas Eve, we deliver cookies and a 1-dish meal jar to our neighbors and friends. We start around lunchtime and spend the whole afternoon doing it. We usually finish around dinner time, and we order take-out pizza. (If Christmas Eve falls on a Sunday, we buy a take-and-bake the day before and heat it up.) Then we build a fire in the fireplace, read the Christmas story from the Bible, and sing Christmas carols until our voices are hoarse. It’s awesome!

    Comment by Keri Brooks — December 14, 2007 @ 7:52 pm

  2. I can hardly call it a tradition because we only did it once; but my favorite Christmas memory was the year my parents separated and my mom couldn’t afford new ornaments for our Charlie Brown tree. We made them out of molding clay and ribbon that year. It was the best:)

    Comment by Paradox — December 14, 2007 @ 8:30 pm

  3. I don’t know which is my favourite, but the three most prominent are opening presents at midnight, reciting the Christmas story, and eating all day Christmas Eve.

    This year, we have been researching traditions of all sorts from our different ethnic backgrounds (there are about a dozen between Mary and me). We are implementing some of the Christmas ones this year, but it may be a year or two before they set into our lives.

    Comment by Kim Siever — December 14, 2007 @ 9:34 pm

  4. I love the pregnant peace of Christmas Eve, after all the work is done, the babies are fast asleep, and I can just SIT, alone and quiet and stare at the tree. It’s one of the mose peacful and beautiful nights of the year, and I look forward to it almost as much as I do watching the kids eyes in the morning. Maybe even more.

    Comment by tracy m — December 14, 2007 @ 10:16 pm

  5. All of the pagan ones are tied for my favorite.

    Comment by cj douglass — December 14, 2007 @ 11:31 pm

  6. One of my favorite memories was going to Midnight Mass with my friends in High School. Now I like going to “Messiah” sing alongs and drinking (and singing about) wassail.

    As for every year things, I’d go with yours, dad:)

    Comment by Bret — December 15, 2007 @ 1:59 am

  7. Our first Christmas together we made our own Christmas ornaments including a star for the top of the tree. The star was made by taping an aluminum-foil covered cardboard star to a toilet paper roll. We’ve used the same star every year since then.

    This year my daughter got married. At Thanksgiving, she made the same tye of star for their tree.

    The star represents our devotion to Christ beginning in our poverty and continuing on.

    Comment by Floyd the Wonderdog — December 15, 2007 @ 8:09 am

  8. Acting out the Nativity while my dad read the story from the scriptures. Being the oldest (and a die-hard traditionalist), I made my siblings do it, even after we were in college/married. Now we get to watch all the grandkids do it (much to my siblings relief).

    My other favorite tradition (besides eggnog, Carols, Advent and presents) is the Jesus Stocking. All of us take some time on Christmas Eve to write down what our gift to Christ will be in the coming year. Then we put it in His stocking. Each year, we re-read what we have written over the years and see if we did what we wanted to give Him.

    Comment by Cheryl — December 15, 2007 @ 8:32 am

  9. Cheryl,

    Your Jesus stocking is a cool idea, I love it, thanks for sharing.

    Comment by Don — December 15, 2007 @ 12:24 pm

  10. You’re welcome, although I can’t take credit for it. My parents were given the stocking and the idea from some friends about 18 years ago.

    Comment by Cheryl — December 15, 2007 @ 12:50 pm

  11. Our new tradition since moving to California is having a picnic lunch Christmas day on the beach.

    Comment by Susan M — December 16, 2007 @ 8:37 am

  12. Ever since my daughter was a toddler, our favorite Christmas traditions have been making a cheese and a chocolate fondue on Christmas Eve, leaving luminaries and reindeer food (oatmeal & sparkles) on the driveway, leaving the cookies & milk for Santa, and running outside to watch the neighborhood Christmas parade go by our house before we go to bed. My little girl is 11 now, and still doggedly holds on to all these traditions, including the existence of Santa– the only difference now is, by the time Santa comes she makes sure she’s settled with the bishop as a full tithe payer.

    Comment by David T. — December 16, 2007 @ 8:11 pm

  13. Ever since my daughter was a toddler, our favorite Christmas traditions have been making a cheese and a chocolate fondue on Christmas Eve, leaving luminaries and reindeer food (oatmeal & sparkles) on the driveway, leaving the cookies & milk for Santa, and running outside to watch the neighborhood Christmas parade go by our house before we go to bed. My little girl is 11 now, and still doggedly holds on to all these traditions, including the existence of Santa– the only difference now is, by the time Santa comes she makes sure she’s settled with the bishop as a full tithe payer.

    Comment by David T. — December 16, 2007 @ 8:12 pm

  14. A rather recent tradition (14 years) and one that, unfortunately, hasn’t involved my children to a great extent (they were all adolescent teenagers when we started) is to travel to our favorite Christmas Tree farm (Snicker’s Gap) just a few miles west of Leesburg, VA to cut our own Christmas Tree. The trees are planted in perfect rows up on the hillside. The farm owner’s and operators are all wondefully nice people and the families and children (and dogs) that come for the experience are all smiley faced and full of Christmas cheer (yes, even the dogs!). Although is has become a lot more crowded and hectic as the years have passed, it’s still a great amount of fun, the trees are beautiful and fresh, and it remains the starting point of our Christmas celebration.

    Comment by Lamonte — December 17, 2007 @ 7:09 am

  15. A rather recent tradition (14 years) and one that, unfortunately, hasn’t involved my children to a great extent (they were all adolescent teenagers when we started) is to travel to our favorite Christmas Tree farm (Snicker’s Gap) just a few miles west of Leesburg, VA to cut our own Christmas Tree. The trees are planted in perfect rows up on the hillside. The farm owner’s and operators are all wondefully nice people and the families and children (and dogs) that come for the experience are all smiley faced and full of Christmas cheer (yes, even the dogs!). Although is has become a lot more crowded and hectic as the years have passed, it’s still a great amount of fun, the trees are beautiful and fresh, and it remains the starting point of our Christmas celebration.

    Comment by Lamonte — December 17, 2007 @ 7:10 am

  16. The kids open one present Christmas Eve. Surprise !! The present is always pj’s so they look good for Christmas morning pictures. We eat our big meal on Christmas Eve. THis way I get get to enjoy Christmas day. Everyone is happy to eat leftovers.

    Comment by JA Benson — December 17, 2007 @ 10:02 am

  17. For 34 years now, we’ve held an extended family Christmas party on the second Saturday in December. Santa comes every year and brings each child a toy, and they each get a Christmas stocking with their name on it. We make Christmas crafts that, cheap as they are, become minor heirlooms as the years pass.

    On the 30 year anniversary, my mother and her sisters announced they were turning it over to my generation. At that point we downsized: my mother is one of ten children, and with children and children’s children it had become too big. So now it’s me, my four sisters and our cousins in town, all the children (about fifteen so far) and a couple of aunts and uncles, who enjoy coming even more now that they no longer have to organize everything. We’ve opened our home to the party for the four years of its new version.

    My wife finds my enthusiasm for this party surprising, as I’m not usually a fan of large family gatherings. But this is a tradition I loved growing up, and I want my children to know it as I did. I fully expect this party will become a 100-year tradition. If I’m very lucky, I may even be around to see it — I was three years old when it started.

    Comment by Chuck McKinnon — December 19, 2007 @ 2:18 am

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