Out of the Best Podcasts

Christian J - July 29, 2008

I’ve always had a love for the pure, unadulterated beauty of talk radio. No faces – just information and delivery. So naturally, I’m a podcast junkie. And since my modes of transportation consists of two feet, a train and a bicycle, I’m left with no other choice but to subscribe to more ‘casts than I have time to listen. But I have narrowed it down to a few select ones. NPR, BBC, Radio Lab, Studio 360, The Onion News and This American Life are all in there. But the crown jewel – the one that rises above the rest is the Daily Audio Bible with Brian Hardin.

I doubt that many of you are not familiar with Brian and his daily venture into the wonders of the Good Book. There might even be a few of you who have politely declined this method of “study”. But let me give my two cents anyway.

Every January, Brian begins a daily study consisting of four parts: OT, NT, Psalms and Proverbs. The daily dose is about .5 hours of him reading these various parts of the Bible. On paper, it might not look very extraordinary but Hardin has found a unique, unassuming way of sharing with us the Word of God.

As a young record producer, photographer and designer, he brings an extremely simple but youthful and creative approach to the scriptures. The podcasts start with a layer of ambient music (nature, guitars etc. – not as cheesy as it sounds) and follows with the gravely but poignant voice of Hardin himself. Each week he rotates between the many different versions of the Bible for a balanced understanding of the text. This aspect has really broadened my understanding of the words and meanings. Why we, as Mormons, still stubbornly hold on to the KJV is beyond me.

At the end of each reading, he will briefly give some commentary on what he has read (no deep doctrine – just finding ways to do God’s will and follow His path) and maybe some thoughts on the Daily Audio Bible community at large – but that’s it. And that is what I love about it – sweet and simple.

It might not be for everyone but its brought me closer to God in a new and profound way. Especially for the never-time-to-read-my-scriptures crowd – I would highly recommend it.

4 Comments »

  1. Sounds neat. I can’t listen to people talk if I can’t see them, so podcasts are wasted on me, but my husband loves that kind of thing. He’d rather listen to people discussing the Lectures on Faith or something, though.

    Comment by Susan M — July 29, 2008 @ 12:41 pm

  2. Like CJ, most of my time is spent walking to class or on a bike, so podcasts are my specialty as well.

    Many of mine revolve around sports (PTI, Around the Horn, Sports Business Radio) or politics (Glenn Beck Insider), but I’m always perusing iTunes for new LDS

    While I really didn’t agree with John Dehlin’s interviewing methods, I think he really helped the LDS get into the podcasting world. He took a lot of issues, interviewed great characters known within the bloggernacle, and helped increase people’s interest.

    I’m really hoping for the next great LDS podcaster…wherever he or she may be

    Comment by brandt — July 29, 2008 @ 3:05 pm

  3. To me it seems that the iPod and iTunes were invented so I, as a 40-something on the other side of the world, in Australia, could listen to BYU Devotionals via LDS Voices.
    http://www.ldsvoices.com/podcast.php

    Comment by Trevor Wood — July 31, 2008 @ 1:54 am

  4. The reason why the church holds on to th King James version is because of the mean used to translate it.
    Taken that the first verse of Genesis can be translated 700 different ways I guess it is better to ask the source to have a close to general truth of what this collection of books may mean.

    Other translations are not bad at all to have. Yet what I have found out that the translation matters little, the way you read the scriptures does a lot more.

    Comment by G — August 2, 2008 @ 4:19 am

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